Last edited by Zugar
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of History of the canal system of the state of New York found in the catalog.

History of the canal system of the state of New York

Noble E. Whitford

History of the canal system of the state of New York

together with brief histories of the canals of the United States and Canada ...

by Noble E. Whitford

  • 97 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Brandow printing company in [Albany .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New York (State),
  • United States.,
  • Canada.
    • Subjects:
    • Canals -- New York (State) -- History,
    • Canals -- New York (State) -- Bibliography,
    • Canals -- United States,
    • Canals -- Canada,
    • Engineers, American

    • Edition Notes

      StatementBy Noble E. Whitford ... Under authority of Henry A. Van Alstyne, state engineer and surveyor.
      GenreBibliography.
      SeriesSupplement to the Annual report of the state engineer and surveyor of the state of New York for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905.
      ContributionsBeal, Minnie M., New York (State). State Engineer and Surveyor., United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Bureau of Statistics.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTC624.N7 A1 1905a
      The Physical Object
      Pagination2 v.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6991167M
      LC Control Number07038621
      OCLC/WorldCa2059401

      Between and , the canal's barges carried anthracite coal from the mines of Northeastern Pennsylvania to the Hudson River and thence to market in New York City. Construction of the canal involved some major feats of civil engineering, and led to the development of some new technologies, particularly in rail : miles ( km). History of the Canal System of the State of New York by Noble E. Whitford () The Story of the New York State Canals by Frank M. Williams () The Champlain Canal. Begun in and completed in , the Champlain Canal was begun at the same time as the Erie Canal - an effort to expand the transport of trade goods from the Champlain.

      The Erie Canal, in New York state (shown below), was mi ( km) long, and connected New York with the Great Lakes via the Hudson River. Locks were built to overcome the ft (m) difference between the level of the river and that of Lake Erie. It opened in .   As New York State prepares to honor the bicentennial of construction of the Erie Canal in , there is new cause for celebration. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds today announced that the NYS Canal System has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

      The 57 locks within The New York State Canal System are used to transfer vessels from a navigation pool at one elevation to another. However, this map does not include the Utica Harbor Lock because at this time it is not open to the public. By clicking on the blue points on the point map, users are provided the name of each lock, its phone number and specific location by mileage along the. New York History - New York History Tables of Contents - , journal published by New York State Historical Association. Natural History - magazine of science, nature, and culture published by the American Museum of Natural History. The site has news of the current issue, and past highlights.


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History of the canal system of the state of New York by Noble E. Whitford Download PDF EPUB FB2

Considered the "Canal Bible" by canal historians and afficionados, Whitford (as the book is often cited) is a comprehensive history of the Canal System of New York up to shortly before the date of publication ()/5(2). Although canals in New York first appeared in the eighteenth century, it was the building of the Erie Canal during the first quarter of the nineteenth century that launched New York State and the nation into the canal era; arguably, no other was as responsible for creating the "Empire State" as was the Erie.5/5(3).

Volume 1 of History of the Canal System of the State of New York: Together with Brief Histories of the Canals of the United States and Canada, New York (State). State Engineer and Surveyor Supplement to the Annual report of the state engineer and surveyor of the state of New York for the fiscal year ending Septem Author: Noble E.

Whitford. NEW YORK STATE CANAL SYSTEM ERIE CHAMPLAIN OSWEGO CAYUGA-SENECA FUN FACTS: It took the muscle power of men and horses eight years to build the Erie Canal. Although it is considered the engineering marvel of its time, not a single professional engineer was Size: 3MB.

The Paperback of the History Of The Barge Canal Of New York State by Noble E. Whitford at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be : Get this from a library.

History of the canal system of the state of New York, together with brief histories of the canals of the United States and Canada. [Noble E Whitford; Minnie M Beal; New York (State).

State Engineer and Surveyor.; United States. Department of the Treasury. Bureau of Statistics.]. New York, built infor transporting stone, by Lieutenant-Governor Cadwallader Colden, who inas Surveyor-General, had made the first report of the natural water communications of New York State.

The first canal in North America, however, antedated this by fifty years, being an attempt at Lachine on the St. Lawrence, undertaken by Dollier de Casson, Superior at the Seminary of St.

Sulpice. won for New York the title of Empire State, sprang up along the line of the Erie canal The shipping which once went to Philadelphia, the nation's biggest seaport before the Erie canal, came to New York; the city grew by leaps and bounds and became the commercial center of the American Union.

Book of Plans of the New York State Barge Canal Map of the Barge Canal and connected waterways [This information is from the Book of Plans of the New York State Barge Canal, a collection of over 11" by 17" engineering drawings issued as a supplement to the annual report of the New York State Engineer, Frank M.

Williams (Albany: Lyon, ). NASA Images Solar System Collection Ames Research Center. Brooklyn Museum. History of the barge canal of New York state by New York (State).

State Engineer and Surveyor; Whitford, Noble E. Follow the "All Files: HTTP" link in the "View the book" box to the left to find XML files that contain more metadata about the original images and Pages: New York State Canal System, formerly (–92) New York State Barge Canal, or Barge Canal, system of state-owned, state-operated waterways, miles ( km) in length, linking the Hudson River with Lake Erie, with extensions to Lakes Ontario and Champlain and Cayuga and Seneca lakes (in the Finger Lakes region).

Helping to shape the Canal System’s future as it nears its third century of operation. Learn more. Canal History.

The New York State Canal System is not only rich in history, but also culture. Learn more about these waterways. The Canalway Trail. Map of the canal system of the State of New York.

Reproduction of a map accompanying Colden's History of the Five Indian Nations. Lock at Little Falls, built about Early canal advocates. NOAA Chart (Small-Craft Chart Book) New York State Canal System (book of 61 Charts) Not yet available on the Print-on-Demand charts format. Specially designed for easy reference and plotting in limited spaces, these charts are arranged in a spiral-bound : $ The Erie Canal and a system of connecting waterways fulfilled DeWitt Clinton’s prophecy that New York would be America’s preeminent state, populated from border to border and generating wealth for itself and the nation.

Soon New York City was the nation’s busiest port, most populous city, and foremost seat of commerce and finance. In New York State legislature authorized construction of the "New York State Barge Canal" as the "improvement of the Erie, the Oswego, the Champlain and the Cayuga and Seneca Canals ".

Inconstruction of the Barge Canal began; it was completed inat a cost of $ to NRHP: Octo   The New York State Canal System is officially years old and the Canal Society of New York and the State Canal Corporation celebrated the big day on Thursday with a ceremony, inviting a Theodore Roosevelt impersonator, unveiling the plaque listing the canals as a national landmark and opening one of the locks.

Mission Statement The Canal Society of New York State’s mission is to protect New York State’s canal heritage and its future through research, preservation, education and advocacy.

Furthermore, the Canal Society seeks to fulfill its mission by working towards encouraging canal scholarship; promote interest in canals here and abroad; acquire, preserve and archive canal documents [ ].

Although canals in New York first appeared in the eighteenth century, it was the building of the Erie Canal in the first quarter of the nineteenth century that lauched New York State and the nation into the canal era; arguably, no other enterprise was as responsible for creating the `Empire State.

From the early years of the canal era to the peak of New York’s canal boom in the s and s, state and federal policies promoted the removal. Starting with the Erie and Oswego Canals in the late s, Syracuse grew around its ability to move people and products all over New York State.

The Erie Canal, completed inran straight through the Village of Syracuse, providing the salt industry - and later, other forms of industry - with a means of shipping their products almost anywhere in the state, as well as all along the East Coast and the .On cover: The New York state barge canal.

Addeddate Call number TCN7A4 Camera Canon 5D External-identifierPages: The Canal opened up the farmlands and mines of New York State and the Great Lakes and made New York City America's leading port.

In order to handle the growing traffic, the Canal was enlarged between and The "Enlarged Canal" was 7 feet deep and 70 feet wide. In the 3rd version of the canal was completed, known as the "Barge Canal".